Tag: stormwater

Girl working on stormwater project in Oklahoma

New Horizons for Market-Based Stormwater Management

The United States Environmental Protection Agency estimates that communities must invest $150 billion nationally in the next 20 years in infrastructure to effectively manage stormwater. A 2017 report from the Willamette Partnership outlines economic instruments that can drive investment or create action to meet federal and state environmental goals. Incentives, subsidies, trading and mitigation hold particular promise.
West Virginia waterfall

Natural Capital Symposium Explores Freshwater Finance

How can the growing community of practice around natural capital approaches continue to engage, learn and adapt? The 2017 Natural Capital Symposium discussed this question at Stanford University on Mar. 20-23. A key session was titled “Securing Freshwater through Innovative Public and Private Partnerships.” This session showed examples of innovations that often required partnerships between public and/or private institutions, development banks, and civil society.

Nine Ideas to Bridge the Gap in Conservation Finance

Consider this: The $400 billion in private environmental finance needed annually, according to Credit Suisse and McKinsey & Company, is eight times even the more generous current estimates of conservation finance. Practitioners and experts gathered last month at the New York City office of Credit Suisse to explore how to bridge that gap and meet the conservation objectives of the United Nations 2030 Sustainable Development Goals. Conservation Finance Network cohosted the event. Here are some key insights from the conversation.

Stormwater Credits in D.C. Could Provide a Blueprint for Other Cities

Taking advantage of a unique credit-trading program in Washington, D.C. that could be replicated in other cities, The Nature Conservancy has partnered with Encourage Capital and Prudential Financial to set up a $1.7-million loan for stormwater management to protect the Potomac and Anacostia rivers. The investment will reduce water pollution, develop rain gardens, and cool urban heat islands. It will also prevent flooding due to climate change and severe weather.