Filtered Topic: Fresh Water

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US capitol

A Pioneering Environmental Impact Bond for DC Water (Updated)

District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority (DC Water) created an innovative municipal bond that covers the downside risk of using green infrastructure to control stormwater runoff. By offloading risk of green infrastructure to investors, the utility created financing for a new approach- and time to get right. Now other...
A lake in Maine maintains clarity (courtesy Maine.gov)

Maine's freshwater supply benefits from fresh ideas and metrics that flow from partnerships.

Case Studies in Clean Water Investments: A Blueprint for Partnership Evolution

To the question “should partnerships advance water quality?”, many practitioners answer: “Yes, but how exactly?” A survey at the outset of the 2021 New England Roundtable showed 36% of participants were “not sure how to get started” with pursuing water utility partnerships, 39% were “already doing it,” and...
Cash flows and rivers flow

The Washington Farmland Trust, which crafted the Conservation Note, provided this image. 

Good Crops, Good Credit: How a Northwest Land Trust Sustains Farmland With Capital

How does a farmer with no desire to keep growing crops become a catalyst for financial value and land preservation? The Washington Farmland Trust worked with a farmer at the end of his career to craft a financial package that would keep his land from developers, sustain ecosystem services, and...

Aligning Conservation and Community Development for Increased Impact in Sentinel Landscapes—and Beyond

What makes efforts to preserve land harmonize with efforts to promote commerce? In this article, we review several examples. Entrepreneurs learn to bolster terrain for hikers (who drink beer), historically sensitive consumers, and fellow merchants. These examples show how creative approaches to promoting conservation and community-based development can yield ongoing...
Pensacola, Florida

The Gulf of Mexico on the Pensacola, Florida coast / Capt_tain Tom / CC BY 2.0

Building Demand in US Water Quality Trading Markets

Environmental credit trading programs have gained traction for pollutants like carbon emissions, at least in concept. Is water quality trading the next frontier? The mechanism offers the possibility of more flexible and cost-effective water quality control, but in contrast to some environmental credits, markets have struggled to gain momentum.

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